Latin America Advocates Free Movement at GCM

At the meeting for the Latin American regional consultation for the Global Compact on Migration, there were calls for the inclusion of free movement in the Global Compact. Many at the meeting said that there were pleased to be able to discuss the issue of migration at such a high level in the UN because it is often ignored or misconstrued by those with a xenophobic agenda.

The participants also discussed the push factors that create migration. They argued that more needs to be done to address poverty and violence in the region if they are to tackle root causes of migration. Many delegates also pointed out that destinations countries should recognise the benefits migrants bring to their economies. 

For the full story visit the IPS article here

Regional Input for the Global Compact on Migration

In the lead up to the UN Global Compact on Migration, the Women in Migration Network is seeking input from women in all regions in order to better understand the specific realities faced by women in migration across the world and to formulate policy recommendations.  We want to hear the urgent concerns of women in migration (in home, transit, destination and return countries) and specific policy recommendations.  What policy would improve the lives and fulfill the human rights of women in migration?

Please submit your comments by September 30, 2017. These will be integrated into a document to be shared with UN member states at the December intergovernmental “synthesis” meeting in Guadalajara, Mexico, and in 2018 negotiations on the Global Compact in New York.  

We look forward to hearing from you! 

 

Our documents

WIMN’s statement on the Global Compact on Migration here in English, French, and Spanish.

Issue Briefs:

  1. General Concerns. Spanish.
  2. Women’s Agency
  3. Push Factors
  4. Racial Discrimination and Xenophobia
  5. Regularisation
  6. Criminalisation & Firewalls
  7. Trafficking
  8. Smuggling
  9. Borders & Detention
  10. Labor Migration

 

Solidarity Center Addresses GCM Thematic IV

Neha misra 24 July 2017 3

Neha Misra addressed the Fourth Thematic Event in preparation for the UN Global Compact on Migration, held at UN Headquarters in NY from 24-25 July. She spoke on behalf of the Solidarity Center, an international labor rights NGO and part of the global labor movement that works directly with migrant workers in over 20 countries, as well as the Women in Global Migration Network (WIMN), a network which convenes organizations and activists to expand rights-centered policies that prioritize the interests of diverse women and families affected by migration around the world. The fourth of six thematic sessions addresses migrants’ contribution to development, remittances and the role of migrant in both economic and social development.

Neha misra 24 July 2017 4                                         Neha Misra, Solidarity Center

Misra questioned the framing of “migrant women’s contribution to development” which instrumentalizes women’s labor rather than affirming women’s rights and agency. “This framing blatantly ignores the lack of worker rights and protections for migrant workers, and the other economic, social and political costs for workers and their families,” she said. She urged full labour rights for all migrants and a world where migrant workers could fully participate in the right to organize and collectively bargain, to guarantee those rights.

“We cannot promote the contributions of migrant workers as stakeholders in sustainable development without providing them with options for fair migration. This means zero recruitment costs; regular forms of migration that are less exploitative than temporary or circular migration programs – regular migration programs that include visa portability, the ability of migrant workers to easily change employers, family unification and pathways to long-term residency and citizenship. The Global Compact should not be used to strengthen migration management approaches that advance profits over rights, including the expansion of temporary work programs, which very often deny migrant workers their fundamental labor rights while also undermining workers’ rights in destination countries by creating a separate class of workers (migrants) with unequal rights. This may undermine the decent work agenda committed to in Agenda 2030. Governments should not be using state policy to enable employers to secure a temporary, low–wage workforce in place of permanent workers,” she said.

Regarding migrant women’s agency, she said that “we must recognize that women in migration are not “vulnerable”, in need of “rescue”, they are advocates for their rights and agents of change. Current migration policies create the contexts of exclusion, inequality and rights violations that put women at risk and in a situation of vulnerability. The migration discourse should not be about “protecting women” but about protecting women’s rights. Migration policy must recognize the rights and agency of women rather than reinforcing gendered power relations.”

See Neha Misra’s remarks here.